Archive | In the News

New virus linked to Colony Collapse Disorder

by Geoffrey Mohan | Los Angeles Times, via CDFA's Planting Seeds Blog | Jan 22, 2014
New virus linked to Colony Collapse Disorder – from the Los Angeles Times

A rapidly mutating virus has leaped from plants to honeybees, where it is reproducing and contributing to the collapse of colonies vital to the multibillion-dollar agricultural industry, according to a new study.

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Lake Tahoe Boat Inspections for Aquatic Invasive Species

by Daniel Kelly, in Live Scientist | Jan 6, 2014

Lake Tahoe now requires inspections on all boats before launching into Lake Tahoe and other lakes in the Tahoe Basin. This short video explains the importance of boat inspections in protecting the "Jewell of the Sierra" and why you should Clean, Drain and Dry your watercraft (boats, canoes, kayaks, etc) and gear every time you leave a water body....and before you come to Lake Tahoe.

After viewing video, read article by Daniel Kelly of Live Scientist.

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Quagga & Zebra Mussels - What are they and where did they come from?

by Keep Tahoe Blue | 2013

Quagga and zebra mussel origins, distribution, biology and transport vectors. A detailed assessment of the impacts they can have on the ecology, economy and culture as told by representatives from various regions of the country and from affected user groups. Ideas on how to avoid being part of the problem and becoming part of the solution. (29 minutes)

After viewing video, read article by Keep Tahoe Blue.

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Fire Ants: Learning to Cope With an Invasive Species | Video

by Live Science | Mar 28, 2013

Scientists at the University of Central Florida are researching a way to manage rather than eradicate fire ants.

State confirms quagga mussels at Lake Piru

by Staff Reports, in vcstar.com | Dec 30, 2013
Photo: Kobbi R. Blair, Statesman Journal

A suspected infestation of quagga mussels at Lake Piru was confirmed by state officials. The invasive mollusks were found on a patrol boat Dec. 18, and initial tests indicated the creatures were quaggas.

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How Google Street View could fight invasive species

by Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience Contributor, in FoxNews.com | Oct 21, 2013
Researchers used Google Street Views to track caterpillar nests from the pine processionary moth; here, different examples of infested trees located along streets in the region of Orleans, France. (PLOS ONE)

Google's online street views could help scientists track and fight invasive species over the Internet, researchers say. Mapping where species are in the world is key to monitoring native and invasive organisms. However, collecting this data can be quite an expensive and time-consuming task.

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Crazy ants invade 20 Florida counties including Palm Beach

by Alex Hobson | ABC Action News, in wptv.com | June 13, 2013
Photographer: Courtesy: abcactionnews.com

Like something out of a bad sci-fi flick, 'crazy ants; are showing up by the shovel-full.

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Cloned Giant Redwoods Planted Around World

by Douglas Main | Live Science | April 22, 2013
California redwood trees.

California's giant redwoods will now be found in six foreign countries. A new non-profit group is shipping 18-inch (46 centimeters) saplings of the trees for people to plant to help fight deforestation and climate change, according to USA Today.

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Invasive Crabs Help Restore Marsh

by Douglas Main | Live Science | April 4, 2013
The invasive green crab, Carcinus maenas.

You may not be able to fight fire with fire, but fighting crabs with crabs may have some merit. Researchers studying the imperiled marshes of Cape Cod were recently surprised to discover that a section of the marsh was coming back, sprouting a "veneer of cordgrass," according to a news release describing the study.

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Tree-Killing Insects Adapting to Warmer Cities

by Megan Gannon | Live Science | Apr 1, 2013
Scale insects on a branch

Bizarre-looking bugs known as scale insects may be tiny but they can take down an oak tree

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Feral Pigs Going Hog-Wild in US

by Douglas Main | Live Science | Mar 28, 2013
This wild boar is a real porker. Although they’re the wild ancestor of domesticated pigs, these guys, Sus scrofa, are much grumpier and can become aggressive if cornered.

Feral pigs are becoming a wild problem in the United States. The wild hogs can now be found in three-fourths of U.S. states — and their populations are growing in many areas — and are estimated to cause $1.5 billion in damages each year, the Associated Press reports.

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Ocean Invaders: Ports Most Vulnerable to Invasive Species

by Becky Oskin | Live Science | May 6, 2013
The highly invasive lionfish is easily available through aquarium and internet sales and represents a potential threat for California waters.

The highly invasive lionfish is easily available through aquarium and internet sales and represents a potential threat for California waters.

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Kudzu-Eating Stinkbug May Attack U.S. Soybeans

by Megan Gannon | Live Science | April 15, 2013
Kudzu bug

Pesky vines of kudzu native to Asia have crept throughout the southeastern United States in recent decades, and now a stinkbug that feeds on the plant is making an American invasion, too. Worse, new research shows that the kudzu bugs' taste for soybeans threatens crops outside of the South.

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Jewel-Colored Flies Spell Death for Baby Spiders

by Jennifer Welsh | LiveScience Staff Writer, in Live Science | 2012
Photographer: 18866-CDFA-Plant-Lab-Shaun-Winterton

Baby spiders beware: Researchers have just described four new types of spider flies, whose larvae infect the bloodstream of juvenile spiders.

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Jewels of Death: Images of Spider
Flies

by Jennifer Welsh | LiveScience Staff Writer, in Live Science | 2012
In this 2009 photo provided by Mississippi State Entomological Museum, a queen Nylanderia pubens (ant) specimen is seen in Starkville, Miss. Hairy crazy ants are on the move in Florida, Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana.

Jewels of Death: Image Gallery of Spider Flies.

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Crazy ants invading US Gulf coast region

by Janet McConnaughey | Associated Press, in The Christian Science Monitor | Oct 3, 2011
In this 2009 photo provided by Mississippi State Entomological Museum, a queen Nylanderia pubens (ant) specimen is seen in Starkville, Miss. Hairy crazy ants are on the move in Florida, Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana.

Crazy ants of a hairy variety are finding their way into the southern United States, from Texas to Florida. These crazy ants, known for their swarming, can even shut down local industry.

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